YOU CAN DO A GRAPHIC NOVEL

WHAT THEY ARE SAYING

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Barbara is a dynamic drawing dynamo. She connects with kids and they respond with their art. She knows how to jump-start their creative process to produce stunning results, teens loved her and her workshop. No one wanted it to end.

Carol Roberts
Troy Librarian


Your command of the classroom and ability to raise the creative level of your students in a very short time were awesome to behold! 

Anne Just
Director, Great Barrington Libraries


Want to turn your teens onto your library? Barbara Slate’s You Can Do a Graphic Novel (Alpha, 2010) may be just the ticket. Having written hundreds of story lines for perennial favorites like Betty, Veronica, and Barbie, along with her own creations like DC Comics’ Angel Love, Slate knows comic books.

Lauren Barack
School Library Journal


Those who can't, teach. I've never believed that, especially when it comes to comics. The latest proof that those who can can also teach comes in the charming form of Barbara Slate's You Can Do a Graphic Novel [Alpha Books; $19.95].

Tony Isabella
Comic Buyers Guide


My granddaughter Abby and I read YOU CAN DO A GRAPHIC NOVEL every night before bedtime. What a great idea and so easy to follow! In all the years that I taught I don't think one art teacher ever taught "cartooning" or I guess the modern term, graphic arts. I wish they had.

Carol Molack
Teacher


I love this book! This is the best "how-to" book that there is out there to teach kids and teens (and adults!) how to create a graphic novel. I know this book is meant for kids, but I just devoured it, and I even started plotting to do my own graphic novel, which I have never ever tried before! The author breaks down the process of creating a graphic novel to make it simple to understand and easy to do. The book is full of wonderful advice and help, plus eye-grabbing graphics in itself! A great book for beginners, or even for more advanced artists!

Hayley
Hanging off the Wire


Although well-illustrated, this isn’t a comic format book. Instead, it’s like having a really peppy instructor hanging over your shoulder, telling you that you, yes, you can come up with a story in pictures. Some pages are nothing but a significant sentence, such as “Nobody likes a boring story,” in centered large text. Other images are done in Slate’s flat, primitive style, similarly conveying the message that if she can do this, anyone can. But you shouldn’t be misled by her happy chat and simple drawings; there are some solid tips here, based on real experience.

Johanna Draper Carlson
Comics Worth Reading

© 2011 Barbara Slate